Lab's Mission

The Bilingual Mind Project is dedicated to promoting accessibility, inclusivity, and celebration of bilingualism. Our mission is to bridge the gap between groundbreaking research on the myriad benefits of bilingualism and wider audiences, including parents of bilingual children, bilingual students, language enthusiasts, and those interested in language acquisition.

We recognize that being bilingual fosters deeper connections, expands job opportunities, and enhances cognitive abilities. We firmly believe that these advantages should be accessible to all, regardless of privilege or background. Our commitment is to empower diverse communities by celebrating their bilingual identity as a valuable contribution to the common good.

Goals

Follow us on Instagram! @bilingualmindproject

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Cristina Lozano, Ph.D.

Principal investigator

Cristina Lozano Arg├╝elles is an assistant professor in the Modern Languages and Cultures Department at John Jay College. Her research focuses on examining the differences in language comprehension between monolingual and bilingual individuals. Utilizing eye-tracking technology, she investigates how interpreting experience enhances second language processing.

Driven by a passion for promoting the value of bilingualism, Cristina founded The Bilingual Mind Project. Through this initiative, she strives to raise awareness within the community about the manifold benefits and significance of bilingualism.

As a native Spanish speaker who is also proficient in English, French, and Asturian, Cristina is continuously expanding her linguistic horizons and currently studying German. You can follow her blog here or follow her on Twitter, Instagram or TikTok, where she shares her fascination with languages and multicultural experiences.

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Kyle Vasquez

Research Assistant

Kyle Vasquez is a senior pursuing a degree in Forensic Psychology and minoring in Law. Being able to switch between languages fascinated her as a child growing up in a bilingual home. She is particularly interested in investigating concerns about whether bilingualism may result in delays in language development because she was brought up speaking both Spanish and English. She is also interested in studying the possibility of brain changes brought about by bilingualism and how these changes can contribute to cognitive benefits. Her main goal is to support bilingual education initiatives at educational institutions and assist the general public in recognizing the advantages of bilingualism as well as the misconceptions and realities around it. Her passion for educating the public about the long-lasting impact that bilingualism can have on an individual and our global community is further fueled by the fact that there is an abundance of unexplored areas related to bilingualism that offer benefits beyond simply enhancing communication and personal development.

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Kyle Vasquez

Research Assistant

Kyle Vasquez is a sophomore pursuing a Forensic Psychology undergraduate degree. She has developed a keen interest in research and is eager to put her ethical research abilities to use in order to provide a secure and inviting atmosphere for the participants. She has always been fascinated by the brain's ability to switch between languages. Having grown up in a bilingual environment, she, like many bilinguals, recognizes the potential of two languages; switching between them can even become an unconscious act! Her passion in helping her community was prompted by her experience with bilingualism and growing up around other bilinguals. She wants to educate bilinguals (and the wider public) not only about the benefits of being bilingual, but also about the cognitive benefits that come with it. She wants to know how bilingualism has improved memory recall and what efforts may be taken to guarantee that bilingualism is seen positively. When it comes to bilingualism, there are numerous variables that may be researched, and she hopes that the efforts of this project will serve as a source of information, encouragement, and recognition for individuals of diverse cultures and languages.

kyle.png

Kyle Vasquez

Research Assistant

Kyle Vasquez is a sophomore pursuing a Forensic Psychology undergraduate degree. She has developed a keen interest in research and is eager to put her ethical research abilities to use in order to provide a secure and inviting atmosphere for the participants. She has always been fascinated by the brain's ability to switch between languages. Having grown up in a bilingual environment, she, like many bilinguals, recognizes the potential of two languages; switching between them can even become an unconscious act! Her passion in helping her community was prompted by her experience with bilingualism and growing up around other bilinguals. She wants to educate bilinguals (and the wider public) not only about the benefits of being bilingual, but also about the cognitive benefits that come with it. She wants to know how bilingualism has improved memory recall and what efforts may be taken to guarantee that bilingualism is seen positively. When it comes to bilingualism, there are numerous variables that may be researched, and she hopes that the efforts of this project will serve as a source of information, encouragement, and recognition for individuals of diverse cultures and languages.

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Sabel Vega Castillo

Research Assistant

Sabel Vega Castillo is a dedicated upper junior student with a passion for empowering the Latino community through education. She is currently pursuing a major in Human Services and Community Justice, coupled with a minor in Latin American and Latinx Studies, demonstrating her commitment to addressing the unique challenges faced by Latino families. Additionally, Sabel is working towards a Certificate in Spanish Legal Translating and Interpretation, which reflects her desire to bridge language barriers within the community.

Sabel's journey back to college was inspired by her extensive volunteer work in her children's schools. Witnessing the obstacles and difficulties Latino parents encountered within the educational system motivated her to take action. Through her own experiences, she not only improved her proficiency in English but also discovered her potential to make a difference. Her return to academia was driven by a genuine desire to further her own education and contribute to the betterment of the Latino community.

Sabel's primary aspiration is to see Latino children thrive in their educational pursuits. She recognizes that many parents within the community have concerns about bilingualism and its potential for confusion between languages. She is determined to spread a positive message about the benefits of bilingualism, instilling a sense of pride within the Latino community.

Former members